Don and Virginia Cazier Family Forum

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Location: Weston, Florida, United States

Obtained a bachelor's degree in political science, a master's in ancient scripture, and a doctorate in educational psychology from BYU. Served with the LDS Church Educational System in Hayward and Palo Alto, California; Athens, Georgia; and Miami, Florida. Served as bishop in Newark, California, and Athens, Georgia, and as stake president of the Sugar Hill Georgia Stake. Served as president of the Mexico City North Mission 1996-99. After retiring from CES in 2004 have served four other missions with my wife: As CES area director in Central America 2004-2006; in Panama 2007-2009; again in Guatemala 2009-2011, this time as executive secretary to the Central America Area Presidency; and finally as a counselor in the Tegucigalpa Honduras Temple presidency, 2013-2014. We are currently serving in the presidency of the Fort Lauderale Temple, enjoying serving being able to continue to serve while living at home. We thought we had reached our photo upload allowance at this site, so began a new blog at donandvirginiacazier.blogspot.com, but can no longer find how to add new posts there, though we can again at this site. Feel free to email us at doncazier@yahoo.com.

Friday, July 20, 2012

Family reunion in Rome!

That's Rome, Georgia, not Italy, where some fifty family members congregated July 13-18 at the Many Streams Ranch northwest of town in a lovely mountain setting.  Kudos to Debbi for making the arrangements and organizing the meals and activities.  Those attending included Ginette's family (including Haley's family, James, and Ginette's four youngest boys), Susan's family, Carina's family,
Malisa and her four youngest kids plus her sister (Danielle), her sister's son (Evan), and her sister's friend (Toni), Regina's family (including Sean's dad, Majid), Janessa and their kids, Kathi's family, Debbi's family, and Don and Virginia (Grandma and Grandpa).  Photos follow:

Group photo.  Click on it to enlarge it.  "Bear cabin" in background, where we largely congregated.

Our first four generation photo with our two great-grandchildren
Four generations of ladies
A hike begins
Gina on hike
The few (2) who persevered found a great view on top of the mountain
This full bottle of whiskey found at the summit is NOT what we referred to above as a "great view."  We left it intact to treat possible snake bite in future hikers.  (It may not cure the snake bite, but it will make them worry about it less!)
Swimming pool behind bear cabin
Close-up of pool party
Kayla with Emma and a conked Cannon
Typical shot of Virginia
Burrows enacting a Sunday scripture story skit
More of the same
Adib and Boix kids enact skit
Yeardley and Lily skit
Janessa's family skit
Malisa family skit
The Wondrous Watsons
Ginette with Leila Boix
Reunion scene
Anya and Alexa doing ballet
Sage and Cami
Abby and Kambry brush teeth with hidden help
Emma enunciates
Megan and Sage
Burrows singing

Malisa and Kayla perform
James tells about his mission.
Debbi shares poem
Abby assaults tomatoes
Male moment
Treasure hunt
The first three
Majid had a way with kids.  Kylie loved him, though she wanted nothing to do with her own grandma and grandpa!

Abominable snowman.  (Now will  you believe?)  A bit shaggy, actually, for a returned missionary!
Lily with new-found friend
Family tree
Cousins
Marshmallows melt
 Sports day at the nearby park
 Braxton having a ball
Kylie applying lotion

 Majid with AnnaSophia Adib and Braxton Boix
Ultimate frisbee
 

More cousins






Thursday, July 19, 2012

Peru Adventures

When I returned from my mission to Uruguay in 1963 (49 years ago), I was able to see such beautiful sites as Iguassu Falls, Lake Titicaca, Cusco, and Machu Picchu, and vowed that someday I would take Virginia back to see them.  This summer we partially fulfilled that promise, as we spent ten wonderful days in Peru, not only with Virginia but with our daughter Susan, our son Ricky, and Ricky's wife Janessa and their two oldest children, Taylor and Abby.  Photos follow:


The Andes were impressive as we flew over them.  Peru has 37 peaks over 6000 meters (19,700 feet) in height.

Cathedral in Cusco
It was winter, at high altitudes, so we dressed warmly most of the time.  Here Virginia stands in front of an ancient Inka wall with stones cut so precisely a knife cannot be fit in between them.  No mortar was used.
Virginia with baby llama or alpaca and native women in Cusco
Fortress of Sacsayuaman, with mammoth stones cut and fit precisely together
Virginia in front of large stone at Sacayuaman

Don in front of another large stone at Sacsayuaman

Tambomachay--sometimes called the Inka's bath
,
Photographer's duel on train to Machu Picchu

Town formerly known as Aguas Calientes (recently renamed as Machu Picchu town) at the base of Machu Picchu
Janessa, Susan, Taylor, and Ricky prepare to hike from our hotel (on left) to the top of Machu Picchu
 They made it!

Abby at Machu Picchu
Don and Virginia rode the bus up!
See the switchback narrow road climbing up to Machu Picchu
More of Machu Picchu.  It's mammoth.  Photos don't do it justice.

Scan of a postcard showing a photo from an angle and on a certain date that makes Machu Picchu look like a man's head.  I thought it was doctored at first, but I discovered that a picture I took actually looks fairly similar when turned on end.  See below.

Interesting!
An obliging alpaca makes for a nice photo at Machu Picchu
Church at Andahuaylillas, known as the Sistine Chapel of the Andes.  Photography was not permitted, but we've included scans of a couple of postcards below.

Painting from the Andahualillas chapel of the horrors of hell.

Companion painting of the glories of heaven--complete with a banquet table!

Elderly indigenous man with native dress
Indigenous woman with baby
Ruins of mammoth Inka temple at Raqchi (90 meters long!)
Tourist market in Raqchi. 
Note distictive hats
Corn drying at Raqchi
Wonderful buffet lunch at Sicuani
Woman threshing grain
At La Raya, highest point on the road between Cusco and Puno, over 14,000 feet
Scenery at La Raya

One of the Uros Islands in Lake Titicaca--manmade.  They are floating islands, made of reeds.  They take about 10 months to make, have to be added to weekly, and last for about 30 years.
This island, which we visited, had about six families on it.
Janessa with local child on this Uros Island.
President of the island demonstrates how the islands are made.
Our entire group on the floating island
Climbing up the island of Taquile in Lake Titicaca
On Taquile--a long way from anywhere
Another view of Taquile

Going to church in Puno was a highlight
Remnants of pyramid at Pucara, dating from about 200 B.C.
Typical scene on altiplano between Puno and Cusco
Alpacas near La Raya

Penned up llamas and/or alpacas at La Raya
Demonstrating teachers block road going through Sicuani
Police in riot gear in Sicuani
Road obstructions in Sicuani
More road blockage in Sicuani
Don with Quinn Gardner in 1963 in Pisac, on market day

Same tree in same plaza in Pisac, same guy, different companion
Terraces and ruins at Pisac
Ruins at Pisac

Local musician poses at Pisac
Mammoth ruins of Ollantaytambo in Sacred Valley

 
Flowers in Urubamba

 
Textile dying demonstration in Chinchero
Weaving demonstration in Chinchero

 In Lima

In Lima

Last evening--in Lima